Ed.  In December of last year, David Brown wrote the following about Theresa May’s Brexit deal: 

[May’s] Brexit “deal” is anything but good for the nation.

This “deal” will cost the British taxpayer 60 billion euros; require that the British still comply with EU rules without having any say in what those will be, and worst of all, it permits the British to leave the EU only if the EU agrees. It commits the British effectively to subjugation by the EU in perpetuity, with no recourse should the British change their mind. It is a prison. It is also the first step of the EU toward its dream of global governance: unaccountable, un-transparent, unelected by the public and with no way out.

There is still a way out of this mess; an easy alternative. The solution is No Deal. Without any further action, the UK’s membership of the EU will lapse on March 29, 2019, and unless that majority can unite around a viable alternative, we will leave. Even better, according to a House of Lords report, there would be no legal obligation for the UK to make any payment as part of a financial settlement.

Well on January 15th, the British Parliament voted DOWN May’s Brexit deal, 432-202.  Gretchen Frazee writes the following for PBS News Hour:

Now what?

[May’s 600 page proposal] would have guided the political and economic relationship moving forward. The deal was the result of a year and a half of work by May, a time during which she was heavily criticized by both pro- and anti-Brexit politicians.

Pro-Brexit lawmakers want more autonomy from the EU than was promised in May’s deal; anti-Brexiters want a closer relationship with the EU. Ultimately, the deal left several key details unnegotiated, including what a free-trade area with the EU would entail and how the UK would go about forging trade deals with nations outside the EU.

Now, there is a March 29 deadline to come up with an alternative. Whatever the UK decides could have significant ramifications for not only it and Europe, but for the U.S. as well, since the UK has long been the principal American gateway into Europe.

“Having a British voice at the table in Brussels has traditionally been useful to the U.S. in ensuring the EU takes a line that is sympathetic to the U.S.,” said Sebastian Mallaby, a senior fellow for international economics at the Council on Foreign Relations. That applies to a wide variety of U.S. interests, from the EU’s foreign policy toward Russia to regulations on Silicon Valley companies that operate in Europe, he added.

Though written before the vote against May’s “Deal,” David Brown’s viewpoint is shared by a great many Brits, that being that No Deal is the only way to honor British voters and remove Great Britain from the clutches of the European Union.

There must be no “deal” — apart from the one for which the British voted and were repeatedly promised (falsely as it turns out) would be honoured.

The “deal” as it now stands is nothing more than a surrender to the EU, the Germans, the French and the Spanish. We shall remain in the Customs Union; the transition period could be extended beyond two years; the “backstop” can only end with EU agreement; the EU will still control our laws and there will be customs checks in the Irish Sea; Northern Ireland will be treated differently, and we will be paying 60 billion euros to be able not to walk out the door.

May’s offer is a surrender. “Leave” voters need to look at this surrender to the EU and dig deep, to June 23, 2016, and what you voted for: To take back control of our country, our laws and our British people first.

There is still, however, a way out of this mess; an easy alternative. Theresa May’s Surrender is not the only deal possible — no matter how many times you hear May and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker repeat each other’s scripted talking points.

The solution is No Deal. Without any further action, the UK’s membership of the EU will lapse on March 29, 2019, and unless that majority can unite around a viable alternative, we will leave, and be free of the EU.

Even better, the UK would be out of the EU with no strings attached and no agreement in place. According to a House of Lords report, there would be no legal obligation for the UK to make any payment as part of a financial settlement.

With no new trade agreement with the EU, the rules of the World Trade Organization would apply and Great Britain would be free to sign trade agreements around the world as soon as it could finalise them.

Those peddling confusion — including the BBC — will talk in terms of “crashing out” with no deal — invoking images of cars overturned, planes ablaze and people screaming.

They are wrong. We will not crash anywhere. We are British. We will leave politely, without a deal, and apologise when someone else stands on our foot.

We will not run out of drinking water, bacon sandwiches, insulin or ferries. Online marketers would smell an opportunity and in an instant fill it for profit. There is whole world market out there, not just Europe. Leaving is our golden opportunity to take a cue from our economically savvy friends across the Pond and “Make Britain Great Again.”

So, dig in deep for a No Deal Brexit. Do not let your MP capitulate to May’s Surrender.

A No Deal Brexit is exactly what most of us voted for. All we need now is a leader prepared to deliver it.